‘The Pale Horse’ by Agatha Christie

The Pale Horse

 
 
Following the murder of a priest, a mysterious list of names is found in his shoe. When the list is linked to a spate of recent deaths and a trio of strange women at The Pale Horse Inn, Mark Easterbrook sets about discovering what’s going on. Along with his sidekick, Ginger Corrigan, he begins to uncover a sinister organisation.

Though I’d read a great many Agatha Christie novels in my teens, this one slipped through the net, but hearing it was due to be dramatized by the BBC, I thought I’d give it a go. First published in 1961, it’s an interesting and at times, sinister, tale, but definitely not one of her best. Also, the author’s excessive use of exclamation marks reminded me why I eventually gave up reading her books.

The BBC version (aired on 9th February) isn’t what I expected either, and while it’s a more interesting story in many ways, I found it irritating that they felt the need to mess about with the plot to such a ridiculous degree. God knows what Aggie would’ve thought of it. To coin an old joke, if she were alive today, she’d be turning in her grave.

  2 comments for “‘The Pale Horse’ by Agatha Christie

  1. 11/02/2020 at 6:40 AM

    I have not read this one either, Colin. I do enjoy Agatha Christie from time to time. I recently read and enjoyed Evil Under the Sun.

    Like

    • 11/02/2020 at 6:53 AM

      Ah, that’s another one I haven’t read. I think from now on, I’ll access Aggie via audiobooks 😉

      Like

Leave a Reply to robbiesinspiration Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: