Category: History

‘Doctor Zhivago’ by Boris Pasternak

Doctor Zhivago Boris Pasternak’s epic novel of love and war throws physician and poet Yuri Zhivago into the lives of two women. Epic is certainly the word, here, and knowing I’d never attempt this in book form, the audio version seemed like a good option. Although it’s basically a decent story, if somewhat improbable (all…

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‘Ghostland’ by Edward Parnell

Ghostland (Audiobook) Tormented by the nightmare of a family tragedy, Edward Parnell retreats into the ghost stories that entertained him as a boy. Embarking on a search for the authors, places and images from those stories, he travels across Britain, exploring the tales of a host of writers, including MR James, Algernon Blackwood, Lucy Boston…

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‘Desert’ by Jack Dolan

Desert A secret German mission during World War Two. A terrible weapon, lost beneath the desert sands. When British archaeologist Jordan narrowly misses being shot while investigating a secret diary, ex-Military Intelligence Officer Roan Mercer and his team set out to track down the assassin. But the team soon learn there’s more to this job…

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‘Go! Go! Go!’ by Rusty Firmin and Will Pearson

Go! Go! Go! The Definitive Inside Story of the Iranian Embassy Siege by Rusty Firmin and Will Pearson (Audiobook) This comprehensive book recounts one of Britain’s most unforgettable news stories of the 1980s. Told by journalist Will Pearson and former SAS member Rusty Firman, ‘Go! Go! Go! The Definitive Inside Story of the Iranian Embassy…

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‘There Was a Country’ by Chinua Achebe

There Was a Country From the author of ‘Things Fall Apart’, ‘There Was a Country’ is Chinua Achebe’s long-awaited account of the significant experiences of his life, most notably during the Nigerian Civil War (or Biafran War). Charting one of the last century’s greatest humanitarian disasters, successful novelist Achebe recalls his observations as a spectator…

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‘The Invention of Murder’ by Judith Flanders

The Invention of Murder With its subtitle – ‘How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime’, this book traces the British public’s interest in murder as a sort of national entertainment. Though the book’s title clearly suggests we’re talking about the Victorian period (1837-1901), Ms Flanders begins her romp through the…

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Killer Pottery

Without the benefits of 20th-century technology, the faces of Victorian villains couldn’t be plastered all over the media, so how were their images and stories relayed to the general public? These days when a murder is discovered, the news hits the media in text, photos and on film, not to mention Facebook and Twitter. However,…

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‘The Five’ by Hallie Rubenhold

The Five Famous for nothing more than being victims of Jack the Ripper, the reputations of five women have for years been tarnished by claims that they were simply prostitutes, sex workers who led selfish, pointless lives. But in truth, their stories have never been told. Now, Hallie Rubenhold uncovers the real lives of Polly,…

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