Category: murder

‘Murder at Mistletoe Manor’ by Holly Tierney-Bedord

Murder at Mistletoe Manor Innkeeper Klarinda Snow gets confused when a bunch of guests turn up bearing mysterious invitations for an all-expenses-paid night at Mistletoe Manor. Following an anonymous delivery of cash to pay for the rooms, the situation doesn’t get any less opaque when Klarinda realises most of the guests seem to know each…

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‘Desert’ by Jack Dolan

Desert AA secret German mission during World War Two. A terrible weapon, lost beneath the desert sands. When British archaeologist Jordan narrowly misses being shot while investigating a secret diary, ex-Military Intelligence Officer Roan Mercer and his team set out to track down the assassin. But the team soon learn there’s more to this job…

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‘Altered Life’ by Keith Dixon

Altered Life Private Investigator Sam Dyke is offered a job that doesn’t really interest him, but when his prospective employer turns up dead, Sam is forced to reconsider. Faced with a workforce who don’t want him snooping around, an unexpected meeting with his ex-wife and a shady assailant who doesn’t care who gets in the…

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‘The Invention of Murder’ by Judith Flanders

The Invention of Murder With its subtitle – ‘How the Victorians Revelled in Death and Detection and Created Modern Crime’, this book traces the British public’s interest in murder as a sort of national entertainment. Though the book’s title clearly suggests we’re talking about the Victorian period (1837-1901), Ms Flanders begins her romp through the…

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‘The Moving Target’ by Ross MacDonald

The Moving Target When millionaire Ralph Sampson goes missing, PI Lew Archer is called in to hunt him down before something really bad happens. The trail leads Archer all over Southern California, from sun-bleached canyons and sea-side beach houses to dodgy bars and even dodgier women. But is this case about money, sex or just…

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Killer Pottery

Without the benefits of 20th-century technology, the faces of Victorian villains couldn’t be plastered all over the media, so how were their images and stories relayed to the general public? These days when a murder is discovered, the news hits the media in text, photos and on film, not to mention Facebook and Twitter. However,…

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